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The Usefulness of the Chick Colonisation Model to Investigate Potential Colonisation Factors of Campylobacters

  • S. Cawthraw
  • S. Park
  • B. Wren
  • J. Ketley
  • R. Ayling
  • D. G. Newell

Abstract

The mechanisms of the pathogenesis of Campylobacter jejuni/coli remain largely unknown. Current approaches to the identification of virulence and colonisation factors frequently involve producing a gene knockout mutant, which then requires testing in in vivo or in vitro models. Unfortunately, there is to date no model of human campylobacteriosis. However, the avian gastro-intestinal tract is considered the natural environment of the thermophilic campylobacters. The true importance of these genes can then be seen by testing the deletion mutants in vivo. The chick, therefore, represents an appropriate model for testing genetically-engineered mutants for their ability to colonise and survive in vivo.

Keywords

Parent Strain Maximum Colonisation Colonisation Potential Isogenic Mutant Caecal Content 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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References

  1. 1.
    Wassenaar, T. M., van der Zeijst, B. A. M., Ayling, R. and Newell, D. G., (1993) J. Gen. Microbiol. 139:1171–1175.PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  2. 2.
    Cawthraw S.A., Wassenaar T.M., Ayling R., and Newell D.G (1996). In: Campylobacters, helicobacters, and related organisms (D.G. Newell, J. Ketley, and R.A. Feldman, eds.) Plenum, New York. 295–300.Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1996

Authors and Affiliations

  • S. Cawthraw
    • 1
  • S. Park
    • 2
  • B. Wren
    • 3
  • J. Ketley
    • 4
  • R. Ayling
    • 1
  • D. G. Newell
    • 1
  1. 1.Applied and Molecular Immunology UnitCentral Veterinary Laboratory (Weybridge)New Haw, SurreyUK
  2. 2.Institute of Food ResearchReading, BerksUK
  3. 3.Department of Medical MicrobiologySt. Bartholomew’s HospitalLondonUK
  4. 4.Department of GeneticsUniversity of LeicesterLeicesterUK

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