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Biology of Antibiotic-Producing Microorganisms

  • Giancarlo Lancini
  • Rolando Lorenzetti

Abstract

The genus Bacillus comprises a heterogeneous group of unicellular rod-shaped bacteria, aerobes or facultatively anaerobes, whose prominent characteristic is the formation of endospores under unfavorable environmental conditions. Bacilli are gram-positive, generally motile by lateral or peritrichous flagella. Their main habitat is soil, where they live as saprophytes. However, one species, B. anthracis, is a human pathogen, and other species, notably B. thuringiensis, are insect pathogens.

Keywords

Aerial Mycelium Aerial Hypha International Streptomyces Project Macrocyclic Lactone Polyketide Chain 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1993

Authors and Affiliations

  • Giancarlo Lancini
    • 1
  • Rolando Lorenzetti
    • 1
  1. 1.MMDRI-Lepetit Research CenterGerenzano (Varese)Italy

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