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Coagulation Properties of Chemically Modified Heparins

  • A. W. Stemberger
  • F. Bader
  • S. Haas
  • J. M. Walenga
  • G. Blümel

Abstract

Divalent carbonic acid halides have been used to fix heparin onto biomaterials of biological origin, however, the effect of this process on the coagulation profile induced by heparin has not yet been clearly determined. To investigate this, commercially available unfractionated and low molecular weight heparins were treated with the corresponding halides of adipic and glutaric acid. Clotting tests and chromogenic substrate assays were used to characterize the influence of these derivatives on the clotting mechanism. In a thrombosis model in rats, the anticoagulant and antithrombotic effects of these substances were also analyzed. The in vitro data indicate a loss of the anticoagulant profile. Heparin-catalyzed acceleration of thrombin and factor Xa-inhibition by AT III were diminished following derivatization, although the heparin cofactor II activity was unaltered. However, in an animal model the antithrombotic properties of these heparin derivatives were reduced but still significant. These experiments were repeated with acetylchloride derivatization revealing comparable results.

Keywords

Adipic Acid Glutaric Acid Dose Response Effect Thrombosis Model Coagulation Property 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1994

Authors and Affiliations

  • A. W. Stemberger
    • 1
  • F. Bader
    • 1
  • S. Haas
    • 1
  • J. M. Walenga
    • 2
  • G. Blümel
    • 1
  1. 1.Institut für Experimentelle Chirurgie der TechnischenUniversität MünchenMünchen 80Germany
  2. 2.Department of PathologyLoyola UniversityMaywoodUSA

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