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Glow Discharge Polymer Coated Oxygen Sensors

  • Allen W. Hahn
  • Michael F. Nichols
  • Ashok K. Sharma
  • Eckhard W. Hellmuth
Chapter
Part of the Polymer Science and Technology book series (POLS, volume 14)

Abstract

The need to measure reliably and accurately oxygen concentration in biological media is often crucial. Presently used commercially available and laboratory fabricated systems usually utilize polarographic sensors to measure oxygen partial pressure in aqueous media. These sensors use a noble metal (platinum or gold) cathode connected to a source of electrons, (commonly a battery) and are referenced to a suitable anode such as Ag/AgC1 to complete the circuit. Many methods have been used to improve sensor drift, sensitivity, and response time by permuting cathode geometry, construction details, membrane type and thickness, and electronic correction techniques. For a review of these methods the interested reader is referred to (1,2).

Keywords

Glow Discharge Oxygen Sensor Coated Electrode Calibration Response Uncoated Electrode 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1981

Authors and Affiliations

  • Allen W. Hahn
    • 1
  • Michael F. Nichols
    • 1
  • Ashok K. Sharma
    • 2
  • Eckhard W. Hellmuth
    • 2
  1. 1.Dalton Research CenterUniversity of Missouri-ColumbiaColumbiaUSA
  2. 2.Department of ChemistryUniversity of Missouri-Kansas CityKansas CityUSA

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