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Manipulating Rooting Potential in Stockplants before Collecting Cuttings

  • Brian H. Howard
Part of the Basic Life Sciences book series (BLSC, volume 62)

Abstract

Vegetative propagation is the bridge between plant improvement and commercial exploitation of clonally produced plants. The ease and extent of commercialization is determined largely by readiness to root from cuttings, and ready-rooting has subsequent benefits for “weaning,” “hardening,” rapid growth and batch uniformity. These benefits do not apply when propagation is difficult and cuttings root in low numbers over a protracted period. Speed of adventitious rooting is important because rapid rooting minimizes cutting exposure to adverse environments and to the diseases to which unrooted cuttings are prone.

Keywords

Adventitious Root Formation Exogenous Auxin Annual Shoot Apple Rootstock Basal Stem Diameter 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1994

Authors and Affiliations

  • Brian H. Howard
    • 1
  1. 1.Propagation Science SectionHorticulture Research InternationalEast Malling, KentUK

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