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Effects of Histamine on the Acid Phosphatase Activity of Cultured Cerebral Endothelial Cells

  • Csilla A. Szabó
  • István Krizbai
  • Mária A. Deli
  • Csongor S. Ábrahám
  • Ferenc Joó
Part of the Advances in Behavioral Biology book series (ABBI, volume 46)

Abstract

Acid phosphatase (orthophosphoric monoester hydrolase, EC 3.1.3.2) is widely distributed in nature and has been studied thoroughly in both plants and animals (Hollander, 1971). The enzyme is activated in acidic environment, which is provided by the presence of H+-ATPase, in different subcellular organelles of the exo- and endocytotic pathway (Mellman, Fuchs and Helenius, 1986). Consequently, the low pH provides favourable conditions for enzymatic hydrolyses in lysosomes; the proton gradient is used as an energy source for the coupled transport of biogenic amines. whereas the difference in pH between the endosome and the extracellular environment is used by the cell in receptor mediated endocytosis to provide symmetry to the recycling circuit between the two compartments (Mellman, Fuchs and Helenius, 1986).

Keywords

Acid Phosphatase Acid Phosphatase Activity Molecular Weight Form Cerebral Endothelial Cell APase Activity 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1996

Authors and Affiliations

  • Csilla A. Szabó
    • 1
  • István Krizbai
    • 1
  • Mária A. Deli
    • 1
  • Csongor S. Ábrahám
    • 2
  • Ferenc Joó
    • 1
  1. 1.Laboratory of Molecular NeurobiologyInstitute of Biophysics Biological Research CenterSzegedHungary
  2. 2.Department of PaediatricsAlbert Szent-Györgyi Medical UniversitySzegedHungary

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