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Abstracts

  • D. L. Feinstein
  • E. Galea
  • B. Rolland
  • C. Fages
  • B. Charmeteau
  • M. Tardy
  • M. A. Philbert
  • K. R. Reuhl
  • T. Primiano
  • R. F. Novak
  • H. E. Lowndes
  • Norma Lake
  • J. Neuhaus
  • S. Fedoroff
  • E. M. Abd-El-Basset
  • G. Blevins
  • R. Devon
  • R. Doucette
  • G. Bruner
  • S. Murphy
  • M. P. Rathbone
  • M. L. Simmons
  • D. J. Reis
  • L. Latzkovits
  • H. F. Cserr
  • C. S. Patlak
  • K. D. Pettigrew
  • A. Rimanoczy
  • B. H. J. Juurlink
  • R. Robitaille
  • B. S. Jahromi
  • M. P. Charlton
  • L. C. Ang
  • B. Bhaumick
  • A. Westmeyer
  • U. Junghans
  • H. W. Müller
  • C. Schmalenbach
  • J. B. Sass
  • R. G. Giffard
  • V. M. Bruno
  • L. L. Dugan
  • S. A. Amagasu
  • I. G. Makarenko
  • M. V. Aksenova
  • M. Stagaard-Janas
  • K. Møllgård
  • N. Græm
  • A. Møller
  • M. B. Mydlarski
  • H. M. Schipper
  • X. Ye
  • R. I. Carp
  • R. Kascsak
  • R. Kozielski
  • P. Kozlowski
  • W. W. Yong
  • E. Wright
  • T. Tejada-Berges
  • D. L. Anthes
  • E. Theriault
  • C. H. Tator
  • T. Chan-Ling
  • S. Trout
  • H. Holländer
  • J. Stone
  • W. Wu
  • J. G. Toma
  • F. D. Miller
  • S. Pareek
  • P. Barker
  • T. C. Mathew
  • R. A. Murphy
  • A. Acheson
  • C. W. Moffett
  • C. M. Paden
  • R. L. Levine
  • G. G. Skibo
  • O. L. Berezovskaya
  • D. A. Rusakow
Part of the Altschul Symposia Series book series (ALSS, volume 2)

Abstract

Previous studies from our lab have shown that a cDNA clone encoding GFAP isolated from cultured Schwann cells (GFAP-β) differs from themRNA in the CNS (GFAP-α) by the presence of an extended 5′ untranslated region (UTR). Primer extension analysis of Schwann cell mRNA places the major transcriptional start site 157 bases upstream of the CNS cap site. Polymerase chain reaction assays (PCR) suggest that the longer 5′ UTR is contiguous with the genomic sequence. A PCR assay has been developed to distinguish the 2 GFAP mRNAs and allow rapid quantitation of their levels. GFAP-β mRNA is expressed in various Schwann cell lines to different extents, all of which express exclusively the PNS-GFAP. In RT4-D6 cells, GFAP-β constitutes at least 80–85% of the total GFAP mRNA. As found with astrocytes treatment of these cells with 1 mM dbcAMP for 24 hr led to an increase in GFAP-β levels. GFAP-β mRNA also constitutes the predominant GFAP mRNA in mouse retina, suggesting that all examples of peripheral type GFAP may be a consequence of the longer 5′ UTR. GFAP-β is expressed at low levels in cultured rat cortical astrocytes and is slightly increased (2-fold) by treatment of the cells with 1 mM dbcAMP. In contrast, treatment with IFN-γ, an activator of astrocytc gene expression, led to a dramatic increase in GFAP-p while at the same time causing a decrease in overall GFAP mRNA levels such that GFAP-β represented over 90% of total GFAP mRNA. In rat cortex, GFAP-β mRNA expression paralleled that of total GFAP mRNA levels, reaching maximum levels between postnatal days 10 and 15. Relative GFAP-β levels in cerebellum were higher than in cortex. These results indicate that the regulation of GFAP-β mRNA expression can differ from that of GFAP-α mRNA and, hence, increases in this mRNA may be diagnostic of developmental or pathological conditions from those which influence total GFAP levels.

Keywords

Glial FIBRILLARY Acidic Protein Down Syndrome Motoneuron Survival Major Histocompatability Complex Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor mRNA 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1993

Authors and Affiliations

  • D. L. Feinstein
    • 1
  • E. Galea
    • 1
  • B. Rolland
    • 2
  • C. Fages
    • 2
  • B. Charmeteau
    • 2
  • M. Tardy
    • 2
  • M. A. Philbert
    • 3
  • K. R. Reuhl
    • 3
  • T. Primiano
    • 4
  • R. F. Novak
    • 4
  • H. E. Lowndes
    • 3
  • Norma Lake
    • 5
  • J. Neuhaus
    • 6
  • S. Fedoroff
    • 6
  • E. M. Abd-El-Basset
    • 6
  • G. Blevins
    • 6
  • R. Devon
    • 7
  • R. Doucette
    • 8
  • G. Bruner
    • 9
  • S. Murphy
    • 9
  • M. P. Rathbone
    • 10
  • M. L. Simmons
    • 9
  • D. J. Reis
    • 11
  • L. Latzkovits
    • 1
  • H. F. Cserr
    • 1
  • C. S. Patlak
    • 1
  • K. D. Pettigrew
    • 1
  • A. Rimanoczy
    • 1
  • B. H. J. Juurlink
    • 12
  • R. Robitaille
    • 13
  • B. S. Jahromi
    • 13
  • M. P. Charlton
    • 13
  • L. C. Ang
    • 14
  • B. Bhaumick
    • 15
  • A. Westmeyer
    • 16
  • U. Junghans
    • 16
  • H. W. Müller
    • 16
  • C. Schmalenbach
    • 16
  • J. B. Sass
    • 6
  • R. G. Giffard
    • 17
  • V. M. Bruno
    • 17
  • L. L. Dugan
    • 17
  • S. A. Amagasu
    • 17
  • I. G. Makarenko
    • 18
  • M. V. Aksenova
    • 18
  • M. Stagaard-Janas
    • 19
  • K. Møllgård
    • 19
  • N. Græm
    • 20
  • A. Møller
    • 21
  • M. B. Mydlarski
    • 22
    • 23
  • H. M. Schipper
    • 22
    • 23
  • X. Ye
    • 24
    • 25
    • 26
  • R. I. Carp
    • 24
    • 25
    • 26
  • R. Kascsak
    • 26
  • R. Kozielski
    • 26
  • P. Kozlowski
    • 26
  • W. W. Yong
    • 27
  • E. Wright
    • 27
  • T. Tejada-Berges
    • 27
  • D. L. Anthes
    • 28
  • E. Theriault
    • 28
  • C. H. Tator
    • 28
  • T. Chan-Ling
    • 29
  • S. Trout
    • 29
  • H. Holländer
    • 30
  • J. Stone
    • 29
  • W. Wu
    • 31
  • J. G. Toma
    • 31
  • F. D. Miller
    • 31
  • S. Pareek
    • 31
  • P. Barker
    • 31
  • T. C. Mathew
    • 31
  • R. A. Murphy
    • 31
  • A. Acheson
    • 31
  • C. W. Moffett
    • 32
  • C. M. Paden
    • 32
  • R. L. Levine
    • 33
  • G. G. Skibo
    • 34
  • O. L. Berezovskaya
    • 34
  • D. A. Rusakow
    • 34
  1. 1.Section of PhysiologyBrown UniversityProvidenceUSA
  2. 2.INSERM U-282Hôpital H. MondorCréteilFrance
  3. 3.Neurotoxicology LaboratoriesRutgers University College of PharmacyPiscatawayUSA
  4. 4.Institute of Chemical ToxicologyWayne State UniversityDetroitUSA
  5. 5.Departments of Physiology and OphthalmologyMcGill UniversityMontrealCanada
  6. 6.Department of AnatomyUniversity of SaskatchewanSaskatoonCanada
  7. 7.Department of Oral biologyCollege of Dentistry University of SaskatchewanSaskatoonCanada
  8. 8.Department of Anatomy, College of MedicineUniversity of SaskatchewanSaskatoonCanada
  9. 9.Department of PharmacologyUniversity of Iowa College of MedicineIowa CityUSA
  10. 10.Department of Biomedical Sciences (Neurosciences) and Medicine (Neurology)McMaster University Health Science CentreHamiltonCanada
  11. 11.Division of Neurobiology, Department of Neurology & NeuroscienceCornell University Medical CollegeNew YorkUSA
  12. 12.Department of AnatomyUniversity of SaskatchewanSaskatoonCanada
  13. 13.National Centers of Excellence, Department of PhysiologyUniversity of TorontoTorontoCanada
  14. 14.Departments of PathologyUniversity of SaskatchewanSaskatoonCanada
  15. 15.Medicine and AnatomyUniversity of SaskatchewanSaskatoonCanada
  16. 16.Molecular Neurobiology Laboratory, Department of NeurologyUniversity of DusseldorfGermany
  17. 17.Department of AnesthesiaStanford School of MedicineStanfordUSA
  18. 18.Institute of Developmental Biology Russian Academy of SciencesMoscowRussia
  19. 19.Institute of Medical Anatomy A, Panum InstituteUniversity of CopenhagenCopenhagenDenmark
  20. 20.Department of PathologyHerlev HospitalHerlevDenmark
  21. 21.NeuroSearchGlostrupDenmark
  22. 22.Department of Neurology and Centre for Studies in AgingMcGill UniversityMontrealCanada
  23. 23.Lady Davis Institute for Medical ResearchJewish General HospitalMontrealCanada
  24. 24.Graduate School of the City University of New YorkStaten IslandUSA
  25. 25.CSI/IBR Center for Developmental NeuroscienceStaten IslandUSA
  26. 26.New York State Institute for Basic Research in Developmental DisabilitiesStaten IslandUSA
  27. 27.Montreal Neurological InstituteMcGill, MontrealCanada
  28. 28.Playfair Neuroscience Unit, The Toronto Hospital, Toronto Western HospitalUniversity of TorontoTorontoCanada
  29. 29.Department of AnatomyUniversity of SydneyAustralia
  30. 30.Neuroanatomy LaboratoryDepartment ofNeuromorphology Max Planck Institute for Psychiatry MunichGermany
  31. 31.Department of Anatomy and Cell BiologyUniversity of AlbertaEdmontonCanada
  32. 32.Department of Biology and WAMI Medical ProgramMontana State UniversityBozemanUSA
  33. 33.Department of BiologyMcGill UniversityMontrealCanada
  34. 34.Bogomoletz Institute of PhysiologyKievUkraine

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