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Studies on the Formation of Hepatic DNA Adducts by the Antiandrogenic and Gestagenic Drug, Cyproterone Acetate

1. Adduct Levels in Various Species Including Man and 2. Persistence and Accumulation in the Rat
  • S. Werner
  • J. Topinka
  • S. Kunz
  • T. Beckurts
  • C.-D. Heidecke
  • L. R. Schwarz
  • T. Wolff
Part of the Advances in Experimental Medicine and Biology book series (AEMB, volume 387)

Abstract

Cyproterone acetate (CPA) [Fig. 1] is a sex steroid with strong antiandrogenic and gestagenic action, which is widely used in human therapy. Upon long term feeding CPA causes liver tumors in rats [1]; this activity has been attributed to tumor promotion. The safety of the therapeutic use of the steroid has been questioned recently, since findings from our laboratories indicate that CPA exhibits genotoxic activity. CPA induces DNA repair synthesis in cultured hepatocytes from female rats [2] and the formation of CPA-derived DNA adducts in rat liver and in hepatocytes [3].

Keywords

Human Hepatocyte Hepatocyte Culture Cyproterone Acetate Adduct Level Gestagenic Action 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1996

Authors and Affiliations

  • S. Werner
    • 1
  • J. Topinka
    • 2
  • S. Kunz
    • 1
  • T. Beckurts
    • 3
  • C.-D. Heidecke
    • 3
  • L. R. Schwarz
    • 1
  • T. Wolff
    • 1
  1. 1.Institut für ToxikologieGSF-Forschungszentrum für Umwelt und GesundheitOberschleißheimGermany
  2. 2.Regional Hygiene Institute of Central BohemiaPrague 4Czech Republic
  3. 3.Chirurgische Klinik u. PolyklinikTechnischen Universität MünchenGermany

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