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The Ecology of Genetically Altered Bacteria in the Rhizosphere

  • Daniel A. Kluepfel
  • David W. Tonkyn
Part of the NATO ASI Series book series (NSSA, volume 230)

Abstract

Microorganisms hold great promise as biological agents for the control of plant pests and noxious weeds. Examples include use of fungi to control plant pathogens and weeds in row crops and bacteria to control various insect and fungal pests. Though native isolates can be found that perform specific biocontrol functions, their effectiveness can often be enhanced through genetic modifications. However, before we can enhance the effectiveness of a microbe for biocontrol we must have a thorough understanding of not only its mode of action but also of its behaviour in the environment. Not enough is known about the latter; in particular, it is currently difficult to predict the fate of any engineered microbe released in the environment. Our ignorance is due, in part, to the lack of tools necessary to unravel the complexities of this ecological niche. However, with the help of molecular genetics we can now address such questions about the ecology of root colonizing microorganisms.

Keywords

Fluorescent Pseudomonad Foliar Tissue Lactose Utilization Antibiotic Marker Lactose Solution 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1992

Authors and Affiliations

  • Daniel A. Kluepfel
    • 1
  • David W. Tonkyn
    • 2
  1. 1.Department of Plant Pathology and PhysiologyClemson UniversityClemsonUSA
  2. 2.Department of Biological SciencesClemson UniversityClemsonUSA

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