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Integration of Chitin-Degrading Microbes into Biological Control System for Fusarium Wilt of Strawberry

  • Seiji Ouchi
  • Hideyoshi Toyoda
  • Masayuki Morimoto
  • Toshihiro Kurusu
  • Yoshinori Matsuda
  • Sachio Goto
  • Tamo Fukamizo
Part of the NATO ASI Series book series (NSSA, volume 230)

Abstract

It has been known that an amendment of chitin to soil leads to an increase in the population of chitinolytic microbes and a decrease in the population of soilborne fungal plant pathogens (Boller, 1986; Mitchell and Alexander, 1962). This phenomenon has been applied with some successes to microbial control disease (Sneh et al., 1971; Sneh, 1981). In combination with a chitin-degrading microorganisms (Streptomyces sp.)and a root-colonizing antagonistic bacterium (Serratia marcescens), we successfully protected tomato plants from Fusarium wilt (Toyoda et al., submitted). In our system, an amendment of chitin to soils was essential for promoting preferential multiplication of chitin-degrading microorganisms and subsequent growth of antagonistic rhizoplane bacteria. These previous studies suggested that the pathogen could be effectively suppressed by the use of chitin-degrading microorganisms with antifungal activities, and that this system sould be practically used for the reduction of inoculum potential of pathogens in infested soils, provided the growth of these antagonists was promoted preferentially.

Keywords

Fusarium Oxysporum Alginate Bead Fusarium Wilt Serratia Marcescens Rhizoctonia Solani 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Literature Cited

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1992

Authors and Affiliations

  • Seiji Ouchi
    • 1
  • Hideyoshi Toyoda
    • 1
  • Masayuki Morimoto
    • 1
  • Toshihiro Kurusu
    • 1
  • Yoshinori Matsuda
    • 1
  • Sachio Goto
    • 2
  • Tamo Fukamizo
    • 2
  1. 1.Laboratories of Plant Pathology Faculty of AgricultureKinki UniversityNara 631Japan
  2. 2.Biophysical Chemistry Faculty of AgricultureKinki UniversityNara 631Japan

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