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The Infrared Spectra of Buried Acetate and Rayon Fibers

  • Sandra M. Singer
  • David M. Northrop
  • Mary W. Tungol
  • Walter F. Rowe
Part of the Biodeterioration Research book series (BIOR, volume 3)

Abstract

Textile fibers are frequently found as trace evidence in criminal investigations. The term “trace evidence” refers to any microscopic or sub-microscopic evidence that may be exchanged between the scene of a crime and its perpetrator (DeForest et al., 1983). In addition to textile fibers, trace evidence may include glass, soil, human and animal hair, paint chips and smears and bits of plastic. Such evidence may be very important in identifying the perpetrator of a crime or in reconstructing the crime.

Keywords

Cellulose Acetate Urban Soil Textile Fiber Acetate Group Federal Bureau 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1990

Authors and Affiliations

  • Sandra M. Singer
    • 1
  • David M. Northrop
    • 1
  • Mary W. Tungol
    • 2
  • Walter F. Rowe
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Forensic SciencesThe George Washington UniversityUSA
  2. 2.Department of ChemistryThe George Washington UniversityUSA

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