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Microbial Contamination and Immunologic Reactivity of Stored Oats

  • Stephen A. Olenchock
  • William G. Sorenson
  • James J. MarxJr.
  • John E. Parker
Part of the Biodeterioration Research book series (BIOR, volume 3)

Abstract

Workers in various agricultural environments, from farms to port grain terminals, are exposed to a myriad of respiratory insults during the planting, harvesting, transport, and processing of grains (Donham, 1986). Combined exposures to airborne allergens, toxins, bacteria, fungi, their metabolites and toxins, gases, vapors, and farm chemicals compound the health problems of farm operators and farm workers, many of whom are children and young adults. These types of exposures are not unique to agricultural workers in the United States, but rather, they are global in nature, both in developed and in developing countries.

Keywords

Rose Bengal Hypersensitivity Pneumonitis Farm Operator Airborne Dust Respirable Dust 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1990

Authors and Affiliations

  • Stephen A. Olenchock
    • 1
  • William G. Sorenson
    • 1
  • James J. MarxJr.
    • 2
  • John E. Parker
    • 3
  1. 1.Immunology Section, Division of Respiratory Disease StudiesNational Institute for Occupational Safety and HealthMorgantownUSA
  2. 2.Marshfield Medical Research FoundationMarshfieldUSA
  3. 3.Clinical Section, Division of Respiratory Disease StudiesNational Institute for Occupational Safety and HealthMorgantownUSA

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