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An Epidemiological Study of the Association Between Delayed Estrus in Swine and Low Levels of Aflatoxin B1, in Naturally Contaminated Feed

  • Wayne T. Corbett
  • Cecil F. Brownie
  • Gary D. Dial
  • Kathy Loesch
  • Winston M. HaglerJr.
Part of the Biodeterioration Research book series (BIOR, volume 3)

Abstract

Mycotoxins are secondary metabolites of fungi found as contaminants of feed grains. Some mycotoxins, such as aflatoxin B1 (AFB1), zearalenone (ZE) , deoxynivalenol, ochratoxin A, and T-2 toxin, are toxic to animals when ingested, inhaled, and when topically applied. Many of the toxins affecting animal production are produced by fungal species from three genera: Fusarium, Aspergillus, and Penicillium. These fungi are ubiquitous and under suitable environmental conditions will grow and produce toxic metabolites in feedstuffs and foods.

Keywords

Rectal Prolapse Suitable Environmental Condition Mycotoxin Analysis Reduce Litter Size AFBI Concentration 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1990

Authors and Affiliations

  • Wayne T. Corbett
    • 1
  • Cecil F. Brownie
    • 1
  • Gary D. Dial
    • 1
  • Kathy Loesch
    • 1
  • Winston M. HaglerJr.
    • 2
  1. 1.College of Veterinary MedicineNorth Carolina State UniversityRaleighUSA
  2. 2.Mycotoxin Laboratory, Department of Poultry ScienceNorth Carolina State UniversityRaleighUSA

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