The Association of Deoxynivalenol in Grain with Milk Production Loss in Dairy Cows

  • Lon W. Whitlow
  • Ray L. Nebel
  • Winston M. HaglerJr.
Part of the Biodeterioration Research book series (BIOR, volume 4)


Reports have indicated that in certain geographical locations and in certain years there can be a high incidence of feedstuffs contaminated with aflatoxin (Nichols 1983), deoxynivalenol (DON) (Vesonder et al., 1978; Mirocha, 1974), zearalenone (Shotwell et al., 1980) or ochratoxin A (Hamilton et al., 1982). The practical importance of these and other mycotoxins in feedstuffs which have the potential of affecting the health and productivity of farm animals is a topic of intensive investigation. The significance of DON-contamination of poultry and dairy feedstuffs is particularly controversial.


Milk Production Dairy Cattle Aflatoxin Contamination Liquid Chromatographic Determination Infected Corn 


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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1994

Authors and Affiliations

  • Lon W. Whitlow
    • 1
  • Ray L. Nebel
    • 2
  • Winston M. HaglerJr.
    • 3
  1. 1.Department of Animal ScienceNorth Carolina State UniversityRaleighUSA
  2. 2.Department of Dairy ScienceVirginia Polytechnic Institute and State UniversityBlacksburgUSA
  3. 3.Mycotoxin Laboratory, Department of Poultry ScienceNorth Carolina State UniversityRaleighUSA

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