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Tears

  • Elaine R. Berman
Part of the Perspectives in Vision Research book series (PIVR)

Abstract

The precorneal and conjunctival tear film forms an interface between the air and ocular tissues. Some of its important functions are (1) lubrication of the eyelids, (2) formation of a smooth and even layer over an otherwise irregular corneal surface, and (3) provision of antibacterial systems for the ocular surface and nutrients for the corneal epithelium (Bron, 1985; Lamberts, 1987a). The tear film also serves as a vehicle for the entry of PMNs (polymorphonuclear leukocytes) in case of injury and dilutes and washes away toxic irritants from the ocular surface.

Keywords

Vasoactive Intestinal Peptide Ocular Surface Lacrimal Gland Meibomian Gland Meibomian Gland Dysfunction 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1991

Authors and Affiliations

  • Elaine R. Berman
    • 1
  1. 1.Hadassah-Hebrew University Medical SchoolJerusalemIsrael

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