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Analytical Methods for [3H]-Enisoprost, an Anti-Secretory PGE1 Analogue, and its Metabolites

  • L. A. Allan
  • A. J. Hawkins
  • J. Firth
  • R. D. Brownsill
  • J. A. Steiner
  • C. W. Vose
Part of the Methodological Surveys in Biochemistry and Analysis book series (MSBA, volume 18 A)

Abstract

This article describes analytical methods developed to study the disposition of [3 H]enisoprost, a PGE1 analogue, in man. Solid-phase extraction and HPLRC* were used. These methods were scaled up to allow isolation and purification of urinary metabolites. These were identified by GC-MS of their ME-MO-TMS and PFB-MO-TMS derivatives. The latter provided mol. wt. data from the intense [M-PFB]- ions formed by NCI with ammonia, and the former provided information on sites of metabolism from the characteristic EI fragmentation pathways. The addition of a cholinesterase inhibitor, 2 M pyridostigmine bromide, served to stabilize enisoprost in whole blood immediately after collection; in its absence enisoprost was rapidly degraded to its carboxylic acid metabolite (SC-36067).

Keywords

Tritiated Water Azeotropic Distillation Potential Metabolite Ylic Acid Pyridostigmine Bromide 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

Abbreviation

HPLRC

high performance liquid radiochromatography

MS

mass spectrometry (EI, electron-impact mode

NCI

negative-ion chemical ionization)

MS

methyl ester

MO

0-methyloxime [rendered as MoMe in art. #A-1]

PFB

pentafluorobenzyl

TMS

trimethylsilyl

PG

prostaglandin

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1988

Authors and Affiliations

  • L. A. Allan
    • 1
  • A. J. Hawkins
    • 1
  • J. Firth
    • 1
  • R. D. Brownsill
    • 1
  • J. A. Steiner
    • 1
  • C. W. Vose
    • 1
  1. 1.G.D. Searle and Co. Ltd.High Wycombe, BucksUK

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