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Implications of Monogamy for Infant Social Development in Mammals

  • Devra G. Kleiman
Part of the Genesis of Behavior book series (GOBE, volume 4)

Abstract

Monogamy is a relatively rare mating system among the mammals, probably because of the ability of the mammalian female to rear offspring in the absence of any parental investment by a male. Females both gestate and lactate, and they can typically ensure their offsprings’ survivorship to the point of weaning and independence (Kleiman, 1977). Monogamy has evolved in diverse mammals, and the basis for its evolution appears to have differed in different groups. Some of the selective forces that may have influenced the evolution of monogamy in mammals include high rates of intrasexual aggression among females, limited polygyny potential in males, and nonshareable indispensable male parental care (Kleiman, 1977; Wittenberger & Tilson, 1980).

Keywords

Parental Care Common Marmoset Prairie Vole Lion Tamarin Maned Wolf 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1984

Authors and Affiliations

  • Devra G. Kleiman
    • 1
  1. 1.Smithsonian InstitutionDepartment of Zoological Research, National Zoological ParkUSA

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