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Cognitive-Behavioral Therapies with Children and Adolescents

An Integrative Overview
  • Philip C. Kendall
  • Susan M. Panichelli-Mindel
  • Michael A. Gerow

Abstract

In general, psychological theory and underlying world views guide psychological therapy. One begins with ontological and epistemological assumptions about the world and how humans operate within it (stated either explicitly or implicitly), and from these assumptions, one constructs either a theory of human behavior or a research paradigm to study human behavior or both. In the field of clinical child psychology there has been an increasing interest in the formulation of cognitive-behavioral theories, especially as they relate to psychopathology and psychotherapy. These theories, tied to empirical data (i.e., observations of phenomena), attempt to identify concepts that generalize to broader circumstances. This chapter provides an overview of the emerging and evolving cognitive-behavioral position, especially as it relates to psychosocial therapy with children. We will begin by briefly discussing the theoretical framework on which the cognitive-behavioral position is based. Next, we will illustrate how this theory guides the therapeutic posture of the cognitive-behavioral therapist. In a brief review of the extant literature, we consider cognitive-behavioral applications with a variety of clinical problems in youth. Finally, we suggest future directions for theory and practice.

Keywords

Anxiety Disorder Anxious Child Relaxation Training Aggressive Child Coping Model 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1995

Authors and Affiliations

  • Philip C. Kendall
    • 1
  • Susan M. Panichelli-Mindel
    • 1
  • Michael A. Gerow
    • 1
  1. 1.Dept. of PsychologyTemple UniversityPhiladelphiaUSA

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