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Pediatric Hematology/Oncology

  • Jonathan Kellerman
  • James W. Varni

Abstract

Pediatric hematology/oncology encompasses a wide variety of diseases and disorders including cancer—both solid tumors and leukemias—bleeding disorders such as hemophilia, and the anemias. These present with a correspondingly varied range of symptoms, causes, treatments, and prognoses, as well as associated psychosocial issues. Although a comprehensive overview of these various diseases is beyond the scope of this chapter, disorders upon which the greatest amount of empirical research has been conducted will be discussed in detail.

Keywords

Factor Viii Behavioral Medicine Factor Replacement Bleeding Episode Chronic Insomnia 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1982

Authors and Affiliations

  • Jonathan Kellerman
    • 1
  • James W. Varni
    • 2
  1. 1.Childrens Hospital of Los AngelesUniversity of Southern California School of MedicineLos AngelesUSA
  2. 2.Orthopaedic HospitalUniversity of Southern California School of MedicineLos AngelesUSA

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