Treatment of Family Problems in Autism

  • Sandra L. Harris
Part of the Current Issues in Autism book series (CIAM)

Abstract

There is little dispute among professionals that autism is a biologically based disorder, probably of multiple etiologies (e.g., Schopler & Mesibov, 1987). Although biological in origin, it also appears to be the case that how a family responds to a child’s autism can, in some cases, influence the child’s educational gains and manifestation of behavior problems. A chaotic, disorganized family, or a clinically depressed parent, will have difficulty creating the kind of consistency to which these youngsters best respond. Thus, family problems may influence the development of the child with autism. Conversely, the child’s disability can have a major impact on family functioning. These two factors may intertwine, with family dysfunction heightening the child’s needs, and the child’s behavior problems intensifying family difficulties.

Keywords

Fatigue Depression Beach Sonal 

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1994

Authors and Affiliations

  • Sandra L. Harris
    • 1
  1. 1.Graduate School of Applied and Professional Psychology, RutgersThe State University of New JerseyPiscatawayUSA

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