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Some Characteristics of Nonaversive Intervention for Severe Behavior Problems

  • Glen Dunlap
  • Frank R. Robbins
  • Lee Kern
Part of the Current Issues in Autism book series (CIAM)

Abstract

Among the most salient of developments in intervention for people with autism and other developmental disabilities has been the emergence of nonaversive orientations to the treatment of problem behavior. This salience has been reflected in numerous books and articles (e.g., Evans & Meyer, 1985; Horner, Dunlap, Koegel, Carr, Sailor, Anderson, Albin, & O’Neill, 1990; LaVigna & Donnellan, 1986; Meyer & Evans, 1989; Repp & Singh, 1990), resolutions by advocacy and professional organizations (see Singh, Lloyd, & Kendall, 1990), federally sponsored conferences (e.g., Horner & Dunlap, 1988), and research efforts designed to develop more precise and effective procedures.

Keywords

Problem Behavior Functional Assessment Developmental Disability Severe Handicap Apply Behavior Analysis 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1994

Authors and Affiliations

  • Glen Dunlap
    • 1
  • Frank R. Robbins
    • 2
  • Lee Kern
    • 3
  1. 1.Florida Mental Health InstituteUniversity of South FloridaTampaUSA
  2. 2.Early Childhood Learning CenterAmherstUSA
  3. 3.Children’s Seashore House, Biobehavioral UnitPhiladelphiaUSA

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