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The Physical Rehabilitation of the Brain-Damaged Elderly

A Behavioral Approach
  • Erica M. Sufrin
Chapter
Part of the Applied Clinical Psychology book series (NSSB)

Abstract

Chronic disease and physical disability will seriously affect the lives and function of almost half of those living in the United States at some point in their lifetimes. Of the 20 million disabled people living in the United States, 40 percent are aged 65 or older (Henriksen, 1978). The United States Public Health Service indicates that during a 10-year period, a person in 1 of 10 households will fall victim to stroke (Levenson, 1971). Estimates of the annual incidence of stroke among people aged 65 to 80 range between 870 and 3,430 new cases per 100,000 population (Kurtzke, 1976). In brief, many older people are faced with serious disruption of motor, sensory, and cognitive functions secondary to stroke or other disabling conditions.

Keywords

Physical Therapy Behavior Modification Rehabilitation Program Elderly Person Operant Conditioning 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1984

Authors and Affiliations

  • Erica M. Sufrin
    • 1
    • 2
  1. 1.Department of PsychiatryAlbany Medical CollegeAlbanyUSA
  2. 2.Department of PsychologyRussell Sage CollegeTroyUSA

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