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Women at High Risk of HIV Infection

Behavioral, Prevention, and Intervention Aspects
  • Dooley Worth

Abstract

The need to know how individual women respond to and make decisions about acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS)-related risk-taking behaviors has only recently come to the attention of psychosocial researchers. Before 1986, there was little recognition of HIV infection as a “women’s problem.”1 When public awareness of AIDS as a “heterosexual” problem developed, attention was focused on female prostitutes (who were seen as possible vectors of transmission to their male clients, although there was little evidence for such an assumption)2 and on women as mothers who were also seen as vectors of transmission—to their unborn children.3

Keywords

Human Immunodeficiency Virus Human Immunodeficiency Virus Infection Acquire Immune Deficiency Syndrome Human Immunodeficiency Virus Testing Human Immunodeficiency Virus Risk 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1990

Authors and Affiliations

  • Dooley Worth
    • 1
  1. 1.Montefiore Medical Center and Department of Epidemiology and Social MedicineThe Women’s CenterBronxUSA

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