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Public Health Policy and Bioethical Issues in AIDS

The Case of HIV-Related Neuropsychiatric Illness
  • David G. Ostrow
  • Michael Traugott
  • Jeff Stryker

Abstract

The ability of HIV to cross the blood-brain barrier is by now well known. In fact, central nervous system (CNS) involvement is a common feature in HIV infection.1 Organic mental disease is manifested in as many as two thirds of AIDS patients before they die; at autopsy, as many as 90% of AIDS patients show neuropathological changes of HIV encephalopathy.

Keywords

Human Immunodeficiency Virus Human Immunodeficiency Virus Infection Health Care Worker Acquire Immune Deficiency Syndrome Acquire Immune Deficiency Syndrome Patient 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1990

Authors and Affiliations

  • David G. Ostrow
    • 1
  • Michael Traugott
    • 2
  • Jeff Stryker
    • 3
  1. 1.Midwest AIDS Biobehavioral Research Center, Institute for Social Research, and Department of PsychiatryUniversity of Michigan School of MedicineAnn ArborUSA
  2. 2.Center for Political Studies, Institute for Social ResearchUniversity of MichiganAnn ArborUSA
  3. 3.Department of Public Health Policy and AdministrationUniversity of Michigan, School of Public HealthAnn ArborUSA

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