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Genetics and Eating Disorders

  • Jeanine R. Spelt
  • Joanne M. Meyer
Part of the Perspectives on Individual Differences book series (PIDF)

Abstract

Anorexia nervosa and bulimia nervosa are two of the more physiologically severe psychiatric disorders in adolescents and young adults, yet our understanding of their causes remains limited. Symptoms of these disorders have been documented throughout history. Cases similar to what we now call anorexia were described as early as 700 A.D., when a Portuguese princess was said to have starved herself for so long that she began to look like a man (Lacey, 1982). The distinction between bulimia and anorexia emerged in the late 1970s, and the term “bulimia” was first applied to binge eating and purging behaviors by G. F. M. Russell in 1979 (Halmi, 1987). Diagnostic criteria for anorexia and bulimia nervosa appeared in the third edition of the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, American Psychiatric Association (APA, 1980).

Keywords

Anorexia Nervosa Eating Disorder Binge Eating Body Dissatisfaction Bulimia Nervosa 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1995

Authors and Affiliations

  • Jeanine R. Spelt
    • 1
  • Joanne M. Meyer
    • 2
  1. 1.Department of Clinical PsychologyVirginia Commonwealth UniversityRichmondUSA
  2. 2.Department of Human Genetics, Medical College of VirginiaVirginia Commonwealth UniversityRichmondUSA

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