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The Interpersonal Treatment Model

Teaching Appropriate Social Inhibitions Through the Development of Personal Stimulus Control by the Systematic Introduction of Antecedent Stimuli
  • Ahmos Rolider
  • Ron Van Houten
Chapter
Part of the Applied Clinical Psychology book series (NSSB)

Abstract

Persons with developmental handicaps and traumatic head injury often exhibit behavior problems that interfere with the acquisition of habilitative repertoires. It is sometimes noted that these individuals exhibit these problems more in the presence of some people than others; that is, the presence of some people exerts stimulus control over the occurrence of the problem behaviors. It is also noted that the behavior often occurs more in the presence of some stimuli than others. The purpose of this chapter is to illustrate how severe behavioral problems can be treated through the use of a treatment model that places primary emphasis on establishment of personal stimulus control in the presence of those stimuli previously associated with the problem behavior. This control is established through the systematic introduction of discriminative and eliciting stimuli in a highly controlled and structured treatment environment. Once interpersonal stimulus control is established steps are taken to ensure that it is maintained in other settings whenever necessary.

Keywords

Problem Behavior Antisocial Behavior Stimulus Control Apply Behavior Analysis Home Setting 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1993

Authors and Affiliations

  • Ahmos Rolider
    • 1
  • Ron Van Houten
    • 2
  1. 1.Department of PsychiatryMcMaster UniversityHamiltonCanada
  2. 2.Psychology DepartmentMount Saint Vincent UniversityHalifaxCanada

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