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Functional Analysis and Treatment of Aberrant Behavior

  • F. Charles Mace
  • Joseph S. Lalli
  • Elizabeth Pinter Lalli
  • Michael C. Shea
Chapter
Part of the Applied Clinical Psychology book series (NSSB)

Abstract

The field of applied behavior analysis has developed an impressive technology for reducing the myriad aberrant behaviors engaged in by individuals with developmental disabilities. Most interventions apply basic behavioral principles (e.g., positive and negative reinforcement, punishment, and stimulus control) to discourage aberrant responses and promote adaptive behavior. In pursuit of an effective technology, the field has focused on the development and refinement of intervention procedures that produce large, durable, and general changes in socially meaningful behaviors (Baer, Wolf, & Risley, 1968; Stokes & Baer, 1977).

Keywords

Maladaptive Behavior Apply Behavior Analysis Reinforcement Contingency Behavior Analyst Aberrant Behavior 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1993

Authors and Affiliations

  • F. Charles Mace
    • 1
  • Joseph S. Lalli
    • 1
  • Elizabeth Pinter Lalli
    • 2
  • Michael C. Shea
    • 3
  1. 1.Department of PediatricsUniversity of Pennsylvania School of MedicinePhiladelphiaUSA
  2. 2.Council Rock School DistrictLanghorneUSA
  3. 3.Graduate School of Applied and Professional PsychologyRutgers UniversityPiscatawayUSA

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