Making Someone Feel Guilty

Causes, Strategies, and Consequences
  • Kristin L. Sommer
  • Roy F. Baumeister
Part of the The Springer Series in Social/Clinical Psychology book series (SSSC)

Abstract

Guilt is an aversive emotion. It involves a sense of remorse, regret, tension, and arousal (Baumeister, Reis, & Delespaul, 1995; Tangney, 1995) and often co-occurs with shame (Ferguson & Stegge, 1995; Tangney, 1995). Because guilt is experientially bad, the act of making another person feel guilty clearly qualifies as an aversive interpersonal behavior. To make someone feel guilty is to inflict a negative, undesired emotional state that most people normally try to avoid.

Keywords

Depression Expense Defend Sonal Lost 

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1997

Authors and Affiliations

  • Kristin L. Sommer
    • 1
  • Roy F. Baumeister
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of PsychologyCase Western Reserve UniversityClevelandUSA

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