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We Always Hurt the Ones We Love

Aversive Interactions in Close Relationships
  • Rowland S. Miller
Part of the The Springer Series in Social/Clinical Psychology book series (SSSC)

Abstract

Some marriages work. Now and then, two people somehow manage to fulfill the many psychological and practical duties of marital partners with contentment and delight, remaining intimate, interdependent, and happy with each other for several straight decades. Most marriages do not work, however, especially by a criterion of unbroken bliss. The chance that a new marriage will ultimately end in divorce continues to exceed 50% in the United States (U.S. Bureau of the Census, 1995), but that datum unquestionably underestimates the actual base rate of distress: If one also accepts as broken those marriages in which the spouses (a) are separated but not divorced or (b) are simply miserable, the real rate of failure probably exceeds 70% (Martin & Bumpass, 1989; U.S. Bureau of the Census, 1995).

Keywords

Intimate Partner Attachment Style Marital Satisfaction Marital Conflict Dark Side 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1997

Authors and Affiliations

  • Rowland S. Miller
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Psychology and PhilosophySam Houston State UniversityHuntsvilleUSA

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