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Peroxidation of Lipids in Model Systems and in Biomembranes

  • James F. Mead
  • Robert A. Stein
  • Guey-Shuang Wu
  • Alex Sevanian
  • Minerva Gan-Elepano

Abstract

For a very long time it has seemed to those in the autoxidation field that the cell membrane should be a prime target for peroxidative damage. Its ordered arrangement of the easily oxidized polyunsaturated acids and its proximity to many vital enzymes and other proteins should make a radical initiated and propagated reaction both facile and damaging. The difficulty with proof that this is the case lies in the complexity of the membrane systems and the impossibility of ascertaining exactly where the ultimate effect originated or how it arrived at its visible result.

Keywords

Linoleic Acid Saturated Fatty Acid Methyl Linoleate Lung Lavage Total Fatty Acid Content 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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References

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1980

Authors and Affiliations

  • James F. Mead
    • 1
    • 2
  • Robert A. Stein
    • 1
    • 2
  • Guey-Shuang Wu
    • 1
    • 2
  • Alex Sevanian
    • 1
    • 2
  • Minerva Gan-Elepano
    • 1
    • 2
  1. 1.Laboratory of Nuclear Medicine and Radiation BiologyUniversity of CaliforniaLos AngelesUSA
  2. 2.Department of Biological ChemistryUCLA School of MedicineLos AngelesUSA

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