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Language and Communication Needs of Adolescents with Autism

  • Catherine Lord
  • Patricia J. O’Neill
Part of the Current Issues in Autism book series (CIAM)

Abstract

Adolescence is a time of transition for youngsters with autism as well as for others. Greater interest in social interaction, acquisition of basic self-care behaviors, and familiarity with the requirements of being in a group and in a school classroom place autistic adolescents in a different position in terms of “readiness to learn” than they could have taken 4 or 5 years earlier. In addition increasing concern about vocational skills and potential for community living often influence the goals and expectations set for autistic adolescents by families and professionals.

Keywords

Language Skill Autistic Child Semantic Relation Alternative System Receptive Vocabulary 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1983

Authors and Affiliations

  • Catherine Lord
    • 1
  • Patricia J. O’Neill
    • 2
  1. 1.Department of PsychologyGlenrose HospitalEdmontonCanada
  2. 2.St. Paul Program for Autistic Children and Social DevelopmentSt. PaulUSA

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