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Service Development for Adolescents and Adults in North Carolina’s TEACCH Program

  • Gary B. Mesibov
  • Eric Schopler
  • Jerry L. Sloan
Part of the Current Issues in Autism book series (CIAM)

Abstract

Childhood autism has only recently been recognized as a disorder which can best be treated and managed in the context of the child’s own family and community. Such children have been provided with comprehensive, statewide services in North Carolina, a program for the Treatment and Education of Autistic and Communications handicapped CHildren (Division TEACCH). Beginning as a research project funded by the National Institute of Mental Health and the U.S. Office of Education in 1966, the TEACCH program has been serving autistic children and their families for the past 15 years. It became the first legally mandated statewide program for autistic children in 1972, and now includes a network of 5 regional centers, 34 public school classrooms, and 4 group homes located throughout the state of North Carolina. Over 1,000 children and their families have been evaluated and assisted since the program’s inception.

Keywords

Developmental Disability Autistic Child Group Home North CAROLINA Childhood Autism Rate Scale 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1983

Authors and Affiliations

  • Gary B. Mesibov
    • 1
  • Eric Schopler
    • 1
  • Jerry L. Sloan
    • 2
  1. 1.Division TEACCH, Department of PsychiatryUniversity of North Carolina School of MedicineChapel HillUSA
  2. 2.Southeastern TEACCH Center, Department of PsychiatryUniversity of North Carolina School of MedicineChapel HillUSA

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