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The Development of Infants’ Auditory Spatial Sensitivity

  • Darwin W. Muir
Part of the Advances in the Study of Communication and Affect book series (ASCA, volume 10)

Abstract

Early research in the area of perceptual development has been inspired by two opposing viewpoints: nativism and empiricism. Extreme nativists argue that a perceptually naive infant possesses the perceptual abilities of experienced adults, whereas empiricists such as William James maintain that the young infant’s world is composed of a “blooming, buzzing confusion.” According to this latter view, objects and people gradually emerge through experience from the background of perceptual chaos.

Keywords

Horizontal Plane Sound Source Head Rotation Sound Localization Auditory Localization 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1985

Authors and Affiliations

  • Darwin W. Muir
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of PsychologyQueen’s UniversityKingstonUSA

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