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Cognitive Assessment of Mentally Retarded Infants and Preschoolers

  • James V. Kahn
Part of the Perspectives in Developmental Psychology book series (PDPS)

Abstract

All definitions of mental retardation that have been proposed over the years have included one central feature: deficits in the intellectual (or cognitive) capacity of the mentally retarded person. Professionals working in the field of mental retardation have disagreed on almost every other possible aspect of the definition (e.g., age of onset or diagnosis, etiology, degree of cognitive deficit, other concomitant deficits, and permanence), but all agree that, in order for a person to be considered mentally retarded, he or she must be shown to have a deficit in cognitive functioning. Thic characteristic of mentally retarded persons is so basic that reliable and valid instruments must be available for determining whether cognitive deficits exist.

Keywords

Mental Deficiency Retarded Child Object Permanence Peabody Picture Vocabulary Test Mental Development Index 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1988

Authors and Affiliations

  • James V. Kahn
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Special EducationUniversity of Illinois at ChicagoChicagoUSA

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