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Cognitive Assessment in Deaf Preschoolers

  • Robert J. Hoffmeister
Part of the Perspectives in Developmental Psychology book series (PDPS)

Abstract

The question of whether cognitive development precedes language acquisition in infants is a continuing theoretical discussion. Clearly, cognitive development is a complex interrelationship of mental processes and strategies that relate the development of internal mechanisms to external stimuli. This interrelationship then permits new knowledge to build on old knowledge, which, in turn, creates changes in mental structures and permits their development. Because of the profound role of language in human development, the exact influence of language on cognitive abilities has yet to be determined. Language itself consists of a set of mental structures that interface with cognitive structure (Menyuk, 1975).

Keywords

Hearing Loss Cognitive Development Cognitive Skill Sign Language Cognitive Assessment 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1988

Authors and Affiliations

  • Robert J. Hoffmeister
    • 1
  1. 1.Center for the Study of Communication and Deafness, School of EducationBoston UniversityBostonUSA

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