Assessment of Visually Impaired Infants and Preschool Children

  • Michael D. Orlansky
Part of the Perspectives in Developmental Psychology book series (PDPS)

Abstract

Vision plays a massive and critical role in children’s early cognitive development. Vision provides information that is far more extensive, more specific, and more rapid than any other sense; Padula (1983) maintained that some 80% of a child’s ability to discern relationships, and to establish the perceptual experience necessary for normal development, occurs through the visual sense. Indeed, vision is frequently considered the mediator of all other sensory information, the principal avenue of incidental learning, and even the factor that stabilizes a child’s interaction with his or her world (Barraga, 1983).

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1988

Authors and Affiliations

  • Michael D. Orlansky
    • 1
  1. 1.College of EducationOhio State UniversityColumbusUSA

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