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Biophysical Considerations in the Assessment of Young Children with a Developmental Disability

  • Diane Magyary
  • Kathryn Barnard
  • Patricia Brandt
Part of the Perspectives in Developmental Psychology book series (PDPS)

Abstract

The primary focus of this chapter is to highlight several important issues about the health care of infants and preschoolers with a disability. Development is a complex ongoing process characterized by physiological and anatomical changes. The physical aspects of health—that is, the physiological and anatomical aspects pertaining to the body—will be specifically discussed in relation to various types of disabilities. Routine primary health care needs, as well as specialty health care needs, will be described. Specific assessment procedures for evaluating the physical aspects of health are also included. The discussion is not meant to be an exhaustive treatment of this topic; rather, it is an illustration of selected issues and examples. The consideration of both physical and developmental processes of health is critical in providing comprehensive, quality health care. In addition, the family unit and the home environment need to be considered for an understanding of how health of children and parents may be supported and fostered.

Keywords

Hearing Loss Cerebral Palsy Down Syndrome Developmental Disability Child Birth 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1988

Authors and Affiliations

  • Diane Magyary
    • 1
  • Kathryn Barnard
    • 1
  • Patricia Brandt
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Parent-Child NursingUniversity of WashingtonSeattleUSA

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