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Mastery Motivation and Developmental Delay

  • Lois M. Brockman
  • George A. Morgan
  • Robert J. Harmon
Part of the Perspectives in Developmental Psychology book series (PDPS)

Abstract

Until recently, the assessment of children with developmental delay or disabilities has focused almost exclusively on cognitive abilities, perhaps, in large part because of the available tests which were originally designed to screen for academic potential and success. Though some of these tests have been adapted to more validly accommodate specific disabilities, such as visual and auditory impairments, the same ability areas are still measured. However, the academic success of children with developmental delay or disabilities is generally not the primary concern of parents, teachers, and clinicians. Rather, their first concern is that their children be competent, that is, that they interact effectively in their physical and social environment. Even for normally developing children, success is a function not merely of intellectual capacities but also of such noncognitive factors as motivation and social adjustment (Scarr, 1981).

Keywords

Down Syndrome Developmental Delay Program Planning Free Play Colorado School 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1988

Authors and Affiliations

  • Lois M. Brockman
    • 1
  • George A. Morgan
    • 2
  • Robert J. Harmon
    • 3
  1. 1.Department of Family StudiesUniversity of ManitobaWinnipegCanada
  2. 2.Human Development and Family StudiesColorado State UniversityFort CollinsUSA
  3. 3.Division of Child PsychiatryUniversity of Colorado School of MedicineDenverUSA

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