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Cognitive Assessment of Infants and Preschoolers with Severe Behavioral Disabilities

  • Sydney S. Zentall
Part of the Perspectives in Developmental Psychology book series (PDPS)

Abstract

The area of behavioral disabilities is broad because of the range of disorders that have been identified. Therefore, differentiating among these disorders and identifying disordered children as being different from normals require a more extensive description of characteristics than would be necessary in other disability areas. The characteristics reviewed in this chapter include cognitive abilities as well as those related to cognitive and behavioral style. It is these latter characteristics that provide a basis for the identification of disordered children and of target behavior, whereas cognitive ability assessment provides some indication of prognosis and the framework for instructional programming.

Keywords

Cognitive Style Retarded Child Hyperactive Child Comparison Child Infantile Autism 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1988

Authors and Affiliations

  • Sydney S. Zentall
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Special EducationPurdue UniversityWest LafayetteUSA

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