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Programming for Autistic Students: A Model for the Public Schools

  • Mary M. Wood
  • Sarah W. Hendrick
  • Andrea Gunn

Abstract

The authors gratefully acknowledge the talented contributions of David’s mother, and the teachers at Rutland Center and Oglethorpe Elementary School in Athens, Georgia, for the success of the program described in this paper. We are indebted also to Joan Jordan, Coordinator of the Georgia Psychoeducational Center Network, and Vera Newman, Educational Specialist for the Autistic Program in the Los Angeles Unified School District, for the presentations of their outstanding educational programs for the autistic at the Nebraska Conference on Assessment and Programming for Infants, Preschool, and School Age Children with Low Incidence Handicaps.

Keywords

Autistic Child Primary Word Receptive Vocabulary Home Program Communication Objective 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1983

Authors and Affiliations

  • Mary M. Wood
    • 1
  • Sarah W. Hendrick
    • 1
  • Andrea Gunn
    • 1
  1. 1.University of GeorgiaAthensUSA

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