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Evaluation and Programming for Infants and Preschoolers with Neurological and Neuropsychological Impairments

  • Cathy Fultz Telzrow
  • Lawrence C. Hartlage

Abstract

In order to provide an historical context in which to view current practice in our field, the first two sections of this chapter are devoted to brief reviews of major developments in preschool special education and neuropsychology. Next, a rationale for the application of neuropsychological techniques in the assessment of young children is provided within which to evaluate the contributions of this approach over more traditional models. The next section addresses general considerations in the assessment of young children. The major portion of the chapter focuses on a description of neuropsychological assessment techniques appropriate for infants and preschool children. Two subsequent sections address other issues relevant to neuropsychological appraisal of this population, handedness and the effects of age. Next we discuss the use of neuropsychological assessment data in the development of educational programs for young children. The chapter concludes with an illustrative case study.

Keywords

Preschool Child Neuropsychological Assessment Handicapped Child Dichotic Listening Early Brain Injury 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1983

Authors and Affiliations

  • Cathy Fultz Telzrow
    • 1
  • Lawrence C. Hartlage
    • 2
  1. 1.Cuyahoga Special Services CooperativeMaple HeightsUSA
  2. 2.Medical College of GeorgiaAugustaUSA

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