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The Development of Holomorphic Concepts in Ophiostomatalean Ascomycetes

  • M. J. Wingfield
  • B. D. Wingfield
  • W. B. Kendrick
Chapter
Part of the NATO ASI Series book series (NSSA, volume 269)

Summary

The ophiostomatoid fungi, including, the genera Ceratocystis s.str., Ophiostoma and Ceratocystiopsis, have strong anamorph/teleomorph connections and provide an outstanding model for evaluating taxonomic schemes based on morphology. Recent evidence from extended collections as well as ultrastructural and molecular studies suggests that these fungi have evolved several, if not many times. Primary taxonomic characters for the group such as ascomatal structure and ascospore shape now appear to have been misleading. A great deal of convergence has evidently occurred and re-evaluation of morphological characters based on additional molecular studies is needed before a new and more meaningful classification can be established for this group. Ultimately, we expect that numerous genera, belonging to at least two and perhaps more distantly related groups of fungi will emerge.

Keywords

Bark Beetle Conidiogenous Cell Mycological Research American Phytopathological Society British Mycological Society 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1994

Authors and Affiliations

  • M. J. Wingfield
    • 1
  • B. D. Wingfield
    • 1
  • W. B. Kendrick
    • 2
  1. 1.Department of Microbiology and BiochemistryUniversity of the Orange Free StateBloemfonteinSouth Africa
  2. 2.Department of BiologyUniversity of WaterlooWaterlooCanada

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