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Osiris — An Application of Tomography for Absorbed Emissions in Remote Sensing

  • E. J. Llewellyn
  • D. A. Degenstein
  • I. C. McDade
  • R. L. Gattinger
  • R. King
  • R. Buckingham
  • E. H. Richardson
  • D. P. Murtagh
  • W. F. J. Evans
  • B. H. Solheim
  • K. Strong
  • J. C. McConnell

Abstract

The Odin satellite, which is presently scheduled for launch in March 1998, is a Swedish led joint astronomy/aeronomy mission that includes participation from Canada, Finland and France. The satellite which has a planned lifetime of two years carries only two scientific instruments. One is a mm/sub-mm radiometer (SMR) that will be supplied by Sweden and Finland and will be used to make both aeronomic observations of emissions from the Earth’s limb, in order to study important middle atmosphere processes, and astronomical observations that will provide new information on the physics and chemistry of the interstellar medium. The second instrument is a combined UV/visible optical spectrograph and infrared imager (OSIRIS) that will be provided by Canada. The OSIRIS instrument will make observations that relate to both polar ozone depletion and other important processes in the middle atmosphere. In order to meet these quite diverse scientific objectives the selected Odin orbit is sun synchronous circular, height 600 km, with the ascending node at 1800 LT. The spacecraft is 3-axis stabilized and may be pointed in any direction up to 32 degrees away from the orbit plane, although the exact upper limit depends upon the season. Essentially the orbit plane is along, or near, the terminator.

Keywords

Orbit Plane Differential Optical Absorption Spectroscopy Lead Selenide Linear Array Detector Scattered Sunlight 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1997

Authors and Affiliations

  • E. J. Llewellyn
    • 1
  • D. A. Degenstein
    • 1
    • 5
  • I. C. McDade
    • 2
  • R. L. Gattinger
    • 1
    • 3
  • R. King
    • 4
  • R. Buckingham
    • 5
  • E. H. Richardson
    • 5
    • 6
  • D. P. Murtagh
    • 7
  • W. F. J. Evans
    • 8
  • B. H. Solheim
    • 9
  • K. Strong
    • 2
  • J. C. McConnell
    • 2
  1. 1.ISASUniversity of SaskatchewanSaskatoonCanada
  2. 2.EATSYork UniversityNorth YorkCanada
  3. 3.National Research Council of CanadaOttawaCanada
  4. 4.Physics DepartmentUniversity of CalgaryCalgaryCanada
  5. 5.Routes Inc.KanataCanada
  6. 6.Physics DepartmentUniversity of VictoriaVictoriaCanada
  7. 7.MISUStockholm UniversityStockholmSweden
  8. 8.ERSTrent UniversityPeterboroughCanada
  9. 9.CRESSYork UniversityNorth YorkCanada

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