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An Overview of Thermal Imagers and Their Basic Components

  • Paul Chevrette

Abstract

The primary interest of thermal imagers arises from their waveband of operation, which is their fundamental difference from visible (0.4–0.7 urn) and near infrared (0.7–2.5 pm) counterparts; it is normally located within either the 3–5 pm band or the 8–12 urn band, corresponding to atmospheric transmission windows. Within those thermal wavebands, called short wave infrared (SWIR) and long wave infrared (LWIR) respectively, the blackbody emission of the objects and background in a scene overcomes the reflected energy from the sun or any other external illuminators. Hence, in the infrared (IR) wavebands, objects are self-emitting which makes the thermal imager a day/night viewing system.

Keywords

Focal Plane Array Photon Detector Barium Strontium Titanate Chromatic Aberration SWIR Band 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1995

Authors and Affiliations

  • Paul Chevrette
    • 1
  1. 1.Electro-Optics DivisionDefence Research Establishment ValcartierCourceletteCan.

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