Cognitive Heuristics in Students’ College Decisions

  • Kerry Smith
Part of the Social Psychological Applications to Social Issues book series (SPAS, volume 3)


The choice of college is a complex decision and an important starting point for many young adults. The decision begins the process of higher education, and for many individuals may be their initiation into “adult” choices that have a substantial impact on their future. A “good” choice may mean finding a college in which one will be successful, find enjoyment, make lasting friends, and emerge prepared for a career or graduate school. On the other hand, a poorer choice may result in poor preparation, unhappiness, and a transfer to another college, as well as expensive retraining or more limited academic and career alternatives.


College Life College Entrance Examination College Choice Heuristic Processing Academic Reputation 


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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1994

Authors and Affiliations

  • Kerry Smith
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of PsychologyLoyola University of ChicagoChicagoUSA

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