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Multiparameter Light Scattering for Rapid Virus Identification

  • Gary C. Salzman
  • W. Kevin Grace
  • Dorothy M. McGregor
  • Charles T. Gregg

Abstract

Multiparameter light scattering (MLS) is a term we have used to describe the simultaneous measurement of multiple elements of the Mueller matrix at specific wavelengths and scattering angles. This 4 Χ 4 matrix describes the polarization sensitive transformation of an incident beam of light into a scattered beam of light by a scattering object such as a virus or suspension of virus particles. The Mueller matrix contains a great deal of information about the internal structure and shape of the virus particle. This information is sufficient in many cases to enable discrimination among a wide variety of different viruses of clinical significance.

Keywords

Azimuthal Angle Rotary Stage Output Window Fast Axis Mueller Matrix 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1985

Authors and Affiliations

  • Gary C. Salzman
    • 1
  • W. Kevin Grace
    • 1
  • Dorothy M. McGregor
    • 1
  • Charles T. Gregg
    • 1
  1. 1.Experimental Pathology Group Life Sciences DivisionLos Alamos National LaboratoryLos AlamosUSA

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