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Rates and Mechanisms of Strength Development in Low-Temperature Ash Deposits

  • John P. Hurley
  • Jan W. Nowok
  • Tina M. Strobel
  • Cathy A. O’Keefe
  • Jay A. Bieber
  • Bruce A. Dockter

Abstract

At temperatures below approximately 1900°F, ash particles formed in coal-fired energy systems are relatively hard and not prone to sticking to system surfaces. However, if the ash collects on a surface not exposed to a shearing gas flow such as the downstream side of a heat exchanger or the surface of a hot-gas filter, the deposit can develop enough strength over periods of minutes to days so that it becomes difficult to remove, in some cases growing to sizes that impede the flow of gas. This paper presents data from ongoing measurements of the significance of ash and gas composition, deposit temperature, and time on the rates of strength development in simulated low-temperature ash deposits. Preliminary results of surface composition and particle-size distribution analyses of the ash, including submicron material, are also presented to explain the possible mechanisms of strength development.

Keywords

Strength Development Sulfation Reaction Utility Boiler Subbituminous Coal Candle Filter 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1996

Authors and Affiliations

  • John P. Hurley
    • 1
  • Jan W. Nowok
    • 1
  • Tina M. Strobel
    • 1
  • Cathy A. O’Keefe
    • 1
  • Jay A. Bieber
    • 1
  • Bruce A. Dockter
    • 1
  1. 1.Energy & Environmental Research CenterUniversity of North DakotaGrand ForksUSA

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