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Slagging and Fouling Propensity: Full-Scale Tests at Two Power Stations in Western Denmark

  • Karin Laursen
  • Flemming Frandsen
  • Ole Hede Larsen

Abstract

As part of a project on slagging and fouling in pulverized coal-fired boilers, four full-scale trials were performed at two power stations in Denmark. One took place at the Ensted power station and three at the Funen power station. The coals burned during the tests were from four different continents and varied in rank from subbituminous to bituminous. Chemical analyses of the ashes showed that one coal had a lignitic type of ash while the three others had bituminous ashes. Computer controlled scanning electron microscope analyses of the minerals in the coal and the ashes indicated that the internal locations of the coal minerals influenced the chemical composition of the fly ash particles. Based on empirical predictions of deposition propensities none of the coal types tested would be expected to show major slagging or fouling problems. Deposits collected on probes exposed in the furnace were highly enriched in iron compared to the minerals present in the coal and fly ash. Deposits from the convective pass were also enriched in iron, especially in the initial layer. The extent of the deposits agreed well with the empirical predictions.

Keywords

Downstream Side Upstream Side Electric Power Research Institute Empirical Prediction Coal Type 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1996

Authors and Affiliations

  • Karin Laursen
    • 1
  • Flemming Frandsen
    • 2
  • Ole Hede Larsen
    • 3
  1. 1.Geological Survey of Denmark and GreenlandCopenhagenDenmark
  2. 2.Department of Chemical EngineeringTechnical University of DenmarkLyngbyDenmark
  3. 3.Faelleskemikerne, FynsvaerketOdense CDenmark

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