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An Assessment of Coal-Ash Slagging Propensity Using an Entrained Flow Reactor

  • I. S. Hutchings
  • S. S. West
  • J. Williamson

Abstract

This paper describes the design and operation of an entrained flow reactor to assess the slagging propensity of a coal-ash. Temperatures and residence times have been chosen to closely simulate those experienced by pulverised fuel (pf) particles in a full-size utility boiler. Ash deposits have been collected on ceramic coupons at 1500°C and 1200°C and on an air-cooled metal probe at 830°C.

Ten UK coals and one US coal were selected to give a wide range of coal-ash compositions, a range similar to that found at many power stations. Deposits ranged from dense, highly fused material collected at 1500°C, to lightly sintered ash-particles collected at 830°C. A visual inspection of the deposits allowed a provisional ranking of the slagging propensity to be made. A computer-controlled scanning electron microscope (CCSEM) technique has been developed to provide a quantitative characterisation of each microstructure, thus providing the basis for a more rigorous assessment of the slagging propensity.

The technique described provides the basis for a reliable assessment of coal-ash slagging propensity to be made from a few kgs of coal. It removes many of the uncertainties associated with conventional indices and the previous subjectively based laboratory techniques.

Keywords

Mild Steel Particle Residence Time Coal Research Deposition Probe Back Scatter Image 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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References

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1996

Authors and Affiliations

  • I. S. Hutchings
    • 1
  • S. S. West
    • 2
  • J. Williamson
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of MaterialsImperial CollegeLondonUK
  2. 2.ETSUHarwell, Didcot, OxfordshireUK

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