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Efficacy of Combination Antiretroviral Therapy

  • Ann C. Collier
Part of the Advances in Experimental Medicine and Biology book series (AEMB, volume 394)

Abstract

Antiviral therapy with zidovudine has been demonstrated to prolong survival in patients with acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS) and delay the development of AIDS in persons with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection.1–6 However, monotherapy with zidovudine has limitations; with prolonged therapy, patients continue to have progression of HIV disease and develop the associated opportunistic complications.3,4,7,8 As other antiretroviral agents become available, the sequential use of different antiretrovirals and concurrent use of combinations of agents became possible. A therapeutic strategy which emphasized sequential administration of agents was recommended, although combinations of agents have also been widely used in some settings.9 The sequential strategy was recommended for several reasons, including that data from randomized controlled trials supported its utility. In patients with moderate to advanced HIV who had been treated with zidovudine, switching from zidovudine to didanosine or to stavudine has been associated with clinical benefits.10–12 However, despite continued treatment with one nucleoside antiretroviral agent, HIV disease continues to progress. Other limitations recognized for antiretroviral monotherapy include the lack of sustained improvement in immunologic measures. The limitations in efficacy seen with sequential use of nucleoside antiretroviral therapies suggested that other strategies for suppression of HIV disease should be considered.

Keywords

Human Immunodeficiency Virus Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type Acquire Immune Deficiency Syndrome Human Immunodeficiency Virus Disease Triple Combination 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1996

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  • Ann C. Collier

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